Sunday, December 27, 2015

What We Can Learn From The Holy Family



The Holy Family may seem pretty far out of reach when we take a look at our screaming children, cereal dinners, and night's filled with streaming Netflix...

But the Holy Family is here to help us in a real, concrete way.



Mary: The perfectly patient, always amazing Mother.

Joseph: The quiet, always supportive, hard working Father.

Jesus: Well, he's God, so...


It is so easy to allow the Holy Family to seem out of reach. How can we possibly relate to the most perfect family in the history of the World?

Quite frankly, how can we ever expect to get anywhere on this faith journey? After all, Jesus told us to be perfect as our father in heaven is perfect...

Perfect?! Come on, man! I can barely get out the door with matching shoes on, most of the time.

And while it's easy to get lost in that line of thinking, it's important to take a moment and pause to reflect on how the Holy Family can help us, and what Jesus actually meant when he told us to be perfect.

The Holy Family showed us what love is. The Holy Family showed us what following God's will is all about.

They always said yes, always accepted what came, and always pointed their family in the direction of God.

Sure, that may have been easier for them than it is for us, but if we take the time to immerse ourselves in the trials and tribulations that Jesus, Mary, and Joseph faced, are they really that different than we are?

I see one main difference: They always chose to love.

And that is what Jesus was talking about when he told us to be perfect.

To be perfect by always choosing to love.

And while that may seem difficult when you're mad at your kids for waking the baby, or upset with your spouse for taking too long to get home from work, it's always a response that we have the ability to choose.

To love, especially when the situation warrants us acting in an unloving manner. That's the message the Holy Family brings our way.

Jesus, Mary, Joseph, pray for us, and pray for our families.

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